Author Archives: dau

Review: Rescuing Prometheus: Four Monumental Projects That Changed the Modern World


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Author(s): Thomas P. Hughes

Publisher: Vintage Books

Copyright Date: 1998

ISBN: 978-0679739388

Hard/Softcover: Both, 372 pages

Reviewed by: Dr. Alexander H. Levis
Dr. Levis is head of System Architectures Laboratory, George Mason University

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Defense ARJ 73 | April 2015


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Remarks from the Chairman and Executive Editor


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Dr. Larrie D. Ferreiro

arj73-ferreiroThe theme for this edition of Defense Acquisition Research Journal is “Achieving Dominant Capabilities through Technical Excellence and Innovation,” which is the theme for the 2015 DAU Training Symposium presented by the Defense Acquisition University Alumni Association (DAUAA). The DAUAA sponsors the annual Hirsch Research Paper competition, and the winners of the award for 2015 are: First Place “The Value of Training: Analysis of DAU’s Requirements Management Training Results,” by Charles M. Court, Gregory B. Prothero, and Roy L. Wood; and Second Place “Increase Return on Investment of Software Development Life Cycle by Managing the Risk—A Case Study,” by William F. Kramer, Mehmet Sahinoglu, and David Ang. We congratulate both teams of winners, who were selected from a competitive field of entrants.

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The Value of Training: Analysis of DAU’s Requirements Management Training Results


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Authors: Charles M. Court, Gregory B. Prothero, and Roy L. Wood

In response to Congress, the Defense Acquisition University (DAU) designed and fielded a course of study for Requirements Management, including a 1-week advanced classroom course. While teaching this course, the DAU faculty routinely conducts pre-testing and post-testing to assist the faculty and students in assessing learning and retention. The faculty uses data from these tests, along with student demographics, to assess the value of learning the course provides and to explore some initial assumptions about the readiness of the workforce to learn. Results show a greater than 30 percent increase in learning from pre- to post-test and debunk nearly all the preconceived notions the university held about the incoming students.

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Increase Return on Investment of Software Development Life Cycle by Managing the Risk—A Case Study


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Authors: William F. Kramer, Mehmet Sahinoglu, and David Ang

This research article aims to identify and introduce cost-saving measures for increasing the return on investment during the Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) through selected quantitative analyses employing both the Monte Carlo Simulation and Discrete Event Simulation approaches. Through the use of modeling and simulation, the authors develop quantitative analysis for discovering financial cost and impact when meeting future demands of an organization’s SDLC management process associated with error rates. Though this sounds like an easy and open practice, it is uncommon for most competitors to provide empirical data outlining their error rates associated with each of the SDLC phases nor do they normally disclose the impact of such error rates on the overall development effort. The approach presented in this article is more plausible and scientific than the conventional wait-and-see, whatever-fate-may-bring approach with its accompanying unpleasant surprises, often resulting in wasted resources and time.

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Manage Toward Success—Utilization of Analytics in Acquisition Decision Making


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Authors: Sean Tzeng and K. C. Chang

Large information technology (IT) projects such as Defense Business System (DBS) acquisitions have been experiencing an alarming rate of large cost overruns, long schedule delays, and under-delivery of specified capabilities. There are strict defense acquisition laws/regulations/policies/guidance with an abundance of review and oversights, generating a plethora of data and evidence for project progress. However, with the size and complexity of these large IT projects and sheer amount of project data they produce, there are challenges in collectively discerning these data and making successful decisions based on them. This research article develops an analytic model with Bayesian networks to orient the vast number of acquisition data and evidence to support decision making, known as the DBS Acquisition Probability of Success (DAPS) model.

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Does Your Culture Encourage Innovation?


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Authors: CDR Craig Whittinghill, USN, David Berkowitz, and Phillip A. Farrington

For many years military leaders have been calling for the U.S. Armed Forces to be more agile, adaptive, and innovative in order to defeat future and emerging threats. To assist the military in this endeavor, the University of Alabama in Huntsville explored Department of Defense (DoD) culture at the organizational level.  Having the proper organizational culture can improve performance by empowering members to interact better with their environment, to communicate and act rapidly, and, perhaps most importantly, to innovate. If organizational culture does not encourage innovation, however, organizations can improve innovativeness through culture manipulation. By implementing identified actions that influence cultural attributes, culture can be modified, and subsequently organizations can improve innovativeness, enabling them to meet new and complex challenges.

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Book Review: Engineering the F-4 Phantom II: Parts Into Systems


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arj73-bookAuthor: Glenn E. Bugos

Publisher: Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press

Copyright Date: 1996

Hard/Softcover/Digital: Hardcover, 258 pages, http://www.amazon.com/Engineering-F-4-Phantom-II-Systems/dp/1557500894

Reviewed by: Lee Vinsel, Program on Science and Technology Studies, Stevens Institute
of Technology
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Defense AT&L: March – April 2015


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To print a PDF copy of this issue, click here. PDF copies of individual articles can be printed from the articles themselves.

Aesop’s Guide to Space Acquisition Glimpses of Past and Future


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Authors: John Krieger, William “Lance” Krieger, and Rick Larned

10 United States Code (U.S.C.)  § 2273—Policy regarding assured access to space: national security payloads, establishes the requirement for the President to ensure our access to space.

(a)  Policy—It is the policy of the United States for the President to undertake actions appropriate to ensure, to the maximum extent practicable, that the United States has the capabilities necessary to launch and insert United States national security payloads into space whenever such payloads are needed in space.

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