Tag Archives: April 2012

Defense AT&L: March – April 2012


To print a PDF copy of this issue, click here.


To print a PDF copy of this issue, click here.

mar-12-article-1-lead

The Product Support Manager A Catalyst for Life Cycle Management and Product Support Success


To print a PDF copy of this article, click here.

Author: Sue Dryden, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Materiel Readiness

mar-12-article-1-dryden-headshotThe 2010 signing of Directive-Type Memorandum (DTM) 10-015, “Requirements for Life Cycle Management and Product Support,” was a great achievement for both the DoD life cycle logistics and program management communities. It implemented the requirements of Section 805 of Public Law 111-84 in the Fiscal Year 2010 National Defense Authorization Act and established DoD policy mandating a product support manager (PSM) position be identified and assigned for each acquisition category (ACAT) I and II program office, and be filled by a properly qualified military Service member or full-time employee of the Department. The PSM reports directly to the program manager and fills a key leadership position (KLP) for ACAT I or a critical acquisition position (CAP) for ACAT II programs. Now, for the first time, the logistician has a designated seat at the table as the program office catalyst for life cycle management and product support. The PSM, possessing greater responsibilies, capabilies and a broader, more enterprise-focused interdisciplinary skill set, represents a powerful new resource to assist the program manager (PM) in fulfilling their DoD Directive 5000.01 life cycle management responsibilities. PSMs will help deliver successful “inception through demilitarization” system life cycle product support outcomes.

Continue reading

mar-12-article-2-lead

Professionally Developing World-Class Product Support Managers


To print a PDF copy of this article, click here.

Authors: Bill Kobren and Doug Killey

At the risk of sounding overly dramatic, it is not a stretch to say that we are at a pivotal moment when it comes to DoD weapon system product support and life cycle management. Congress and the president have weighed in with the passage of Section 805 of Public Law 111-84. DoD leadership has contriuted with issuance of Directive Type Memorandum 10-015.

Continue reading

mar-12-article-3-lead

Implementing the Next-Generation Product Support Strategy


To print a PDF copy of this article, click here.

Authors: Mark Gajda and Basil Gray

Accumulating budget pressures and ongoing DoD leadership attention has accelerated the need to reduce weapons system life cycle costs and maximize efficiencies across the entire Department. This focus on total life cycle management has created renewed attention to the weapon system support area (now referred to as product support), an area in which DoD spends over $132 billion annually. As a result, the DoD established a cross-functional team of stakeholders from the Services, agencies, industry, and academia, known as the Product Support Assessment Team (PSAT), to drive critical process changes needed to reduce costs and facilitate next generation product support across the entire enterprise. The PSAT reports to a Product Support Executive Council (PSEC), a select group of flag officers and Senior Executive Service (SES) staff, who provide strategic oversight and a resource commitment needed to implement product support changes.

Continue reading

mar-12-article-4-lead

OK, We Bought This Thing, but Can We Afford to Operate and Sustain It?


To print a PDF copy of this article, click here.

Authors: Mike Taylor and Joseph “Colt” Murphy

Can affordability of weapon systems acquisitions be achieved without considering operations and support (O&S) costs? The answer is a resounding “No!” With pressures to reduce costs driving DoD’s continuous review of programs, business practices, modernization programs, civilian and military personnel levels, overhead costs, and more, leaders at DoD will not only focus on new weapon system procurements, but also the modernization and sustainment of current weapon systems. All DoD programs must strike a balance between requirements and total life cycle costs.

Continue reading

mar-12-article-5-lead

The Life Cycle Sustainment Plan A Review of the Annotated Outline


To print a PDF copy of this article, click here.

Author: Terry Emmert

In late 2011, the principal deputy under secretary of Defense for acquisition technology and logistics furnished direction on the information content and format for the life cycle sustainment plan (LCSP). Although LCSPs have been in use for some time under a variety of names, this direction was intended to improve the document’s utility for all stakeholders in life cycle product support. Several major defense acquisition programs have now been through a variety of milestone decisions using the new LCSP outline. So this is a good time take stock of where we’ve been and where we’re going with the refinement of the LCSP as a stand-alone decision support document and useful tool for programs in product support planning.

Continue reading

mar-12-article-6-lead

Performance Based Logistics and Project Proof Point A Study of PBL Effectiveness


To print a PDF copy of this article, click here.

Authors: John Boyce and Allan Banghart

There has been much debate recently about performance based logistics (PBL) as a sustainment strategy. Claims about the strengths and weaknesses of PBL have usually been based on emotionally charged anecdotal evidence and opinions, rather than facts.

Continue reading

mar-12-article-7-lead

Leveraging Better Buying Power to Deliver Better Product Support Outcomes


To print a PDF copy of this article, click here.

Authors: John Medlin and Jeff Frankston

How often have you heard the expression that systems are “thrown over the fence” from acquisition to sustainment? Or that systems which transition from acquisition to sustainment often didn’t adequately plan for and fund sustainment? As a result of this real or perceived scenario, the under secretary of Defense for acquisition, technology and logistics (USD(AT&L)) has been elevating the prominence of sustainment planning in requirements and acquisition, and instantiating it in policy documentation.

Continue reading

mar-12-article-8-lead

Designing for Supportability Driving Reliability, Availability, and Maintainability In…While Driving Costs Out


To print a PDF copy of this article, click here.

Authors: Patrick M. Dallosta and Thomas A. Simcik

Weapon systems must provide a needed capability, meet user needs as evidenced by operational effectiveness and operational suitability, and must be affordable. While operational effectiveness addresses the degree of mission accomplishment in the intended environment, operational suitability addresses the degree to which a system can be satisfactorily placed in use, given reliability, availability, maintainability (RAM), supportability, and ownership cost, among other factors. These requirements are tested and quantified prior to fielding by the initial operational test and evaluation (IOT&E) process, and assessed against defined criteria. As illustrated in Figure 1, total ownership costs (TOC) incurred during the operations and support (O&S) phase may constitute 65 percent to 80 percent of total life cycle cost (LCC).

Continue reading

mar-12-article-9-lead

Affordable Logistics: Are We There Yet?


To print a PDF copy of this article, click here.

Authors: Lou Kratz and Gil Diaz

Ask any parent to name one of the most frustrating aspects of a family journey, and the inevitable answer will be the repetitive question from the back seat, “Are we there yet?” Despite comprehensive route planning and other travel preparations, the ultimate objective is not the travel, but successful arrival at the destination.

Continue reading