Tag Archives: Darren W Rhyne

U.S.-Coalition Forces and Host Nations DOTmLPF-P for Contingency Procurements Part II (Conclusion)


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Author: Darren W. Rhyne

My previous article in the May–June 2014 issue of Defense AT&L introduced the application of the DOTmLPF-P construct for implementing a host-nation (HN)-first contingency procurement strategy. That article covered Policy, Doctrine, Organization and Training. This concluding article focuses on the remaining areas of materiel, Leadership and Education, Personnel, and Facilities. The recommendations herein are by no means exhaustive but are intended to provide some major areas to consider when executing a HN-first procurement policy such as we attempted to carry out in Afghanistan under Operation Enduring Freedom.

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U.S.-Coalition Forces and Host Nations DOTmLPF-P for Contingency Procurements Part 1


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Author: Darren W. Rhyne

This article uses the DOTmLPF-P construct (defined below) usually associated with non-materiel solution requirements analysis to propose recommendations for U.S.-coalition and host nation government (HNG) forces plus host nation vendors (HNV) when conducting procurements for HNG forces using the host nation (HN) industrial base in a contingency environment. These proposals are by no means exhaustive but are intended to provide some major areas to consider when executing an HN-first procurement policy.

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Acquisition Program Management Challenges in Afghanistan Part 2: Afghan Vendor Base


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Authors: Maj. Darren W. Rhyne, USAF

In my previous article, I wrote about deployed program manager challenges with generating and managing requirements with Afghanistan National Security Forces (ANSF) and Coalition military counterparts. This article will discuss the challenges of procuring defense items made to those requirements from the Afghanistan vendor base in the midst of an active counterinsurgency campaign.

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