Tag Archives: december 2016

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Defense AT&L November-December 2016 Contents


To print a PDF copy of this issue, click here. Individual articles can be printed from the posts themselves.

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When and When Not to Accelerate Acquisitions

 

 

 

 

atl-Nov-16-article-2-thumb An Overview of Additive Manufacturing

 

 

 

 

atl-Nov-16-article-3-thumbEnsuring a Safe Technological Revolution

 

 

 

 

atl-Nov-16-article-4-thumbThe Digital Thread as the Key Enabler

 

 

 

 

atl-Nov-16-article-5-thumbSeparating Hype from Reality

 

 

 

 

atl-Nov-16-article-6-thumbAdditive Manufacturing as a Sustainment Enabler

 

 

 

 

atl-Nov-16-article-7-thumbHarnessing the Potential of Additive Manufacturing

 

 

 

 

atl-Nov-16-article-8-thumbParadigm Shift

 

 

 

 

atl-Nov-16-article-9-thumbMetals Additive Manufacturing

 

 

 

 

atl-Nov-16-article-10-thumbDriving Innovation to Support the Warfighter

 

 

 

 

atl-Nov-16-article-11-thumbGetting AM Up to Speed

 

 

 

 

atl-Nov-16-article-12-thumbGreat Expectations

 

 

 

 

atl-Nov-16-article-13-thumbImplications of AM for the Navy Supply Chain

 

 

 

 

atl-Nov-16-article-14-thumbChallenges of Enterprise-Wide AM for Air Force Sustainment

 

 

 

 

atl-Nov-16-article-15-thumbCollateral Damage

 

 

 

 

atl-Nov-16-article-16-thumbFoundational Principles

 

 

 

 


To print a PDF copy of this issue, click here. Individual articles can be printed from the posts themselves.

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Additive Manufacturing as a Sustainment Enabler


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By Marilyn Gaska, Ph.D. – Teresa Clement, Ph.D.

From an industry perspective, additive manufacturing (AM) has been a focus for more than 10 years, though rapid prototyping has actually been in practice for over 30 years with early emphasis and continued usage primarily during design and manufacturing of new systems. Continue reading

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Paradigm Shift


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By Brett P. Conner

The attributes of additive manufacturing (AM) enable tremendous value for the Department of Defense (DoD). In order to take advantage of those attributes, the DoD must actively pivot away from the acquisition, logistics, sustainment and contracting practices developed from more than 100 years of experiences in utilizing conventional manufacturing processes from the Industrial Revolution. To understand why, we first need to examine what the Industrial Revolution gave us. Continue reading

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Driving Innovation to Support the Warfighter


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By Kelly Morris

The spotlight is on for additive manufacturing (AM) in the commercial sector, but it is also intense for the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA), which hopes to capitalize on the promise of innovation to improve readiness and support to the military. As it tracks AM through the Gartner Hype Cycle, which depicts phases that innovations move through from the initial “Innovation Trigger” through the “Plateau of Productivity,” is DLA headed down the “trough of disillusionment” or up the “slope of enlightenment” to a “productive plateau” for AM investments? (See Figure 1.) The productive plateau is where mainstream adoption starts to take off. Criteria for assessing provider viability are more clearly defined and the technology’s broad market applicability and relevance are clearly paying off. Continue reading

When and When Not to Accelerate Acquisitions


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By Frank Kendall

frank-kendall-headshotWhy don’t we do all our acquisition programs faster? What keeps us from having all acquisition programs be “rapid” acquisitions? The short answer is that, if we choose to, we can trade quality for time.
Sometimes that is smart, and
sometimes it isn’t.

Continue reading

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An Overview of Additive Manufacturing


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By Mark Vitale  –  Mark Cotteleer  –  Jonathan Holdowsky

Additive manufacturing (AM)—known also as “3D printing”—has exploded into public consciousness over the past several years. Stories and perspectives seem to appear in the popular press and technology blogs on a near daily basis.    Continue reading

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Ensuring a Safe Technological Revolution


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By William E. Frazier, Ph.D.   –  Elizabeth L. McMichael  –  Jennifer Wolk, Ph.D.  –  Caroline Scheck

In an era of increasing global hostilities, the Department of Defense (DoD) faces increasing fiscal constraints. Maritime security challenges continue while the defense industrial base shrinks, platforms and systems age and readiness declines. To help confront these challenges and meet the needs of defense missions, new enabling technologies must be identified and integrated into the DoD. Continue reading

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The Digital Thread as the Key Enabler


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By Col. Keith Bearden, USAF

You are down in the trenches trying to deliver agile war-winning capabilities every day, regardless of your Service or affiliation. Your time is valuable and you constantly find yourself facing more and more requirements on your time. The engineering community is seeking ways to reduce your workload while at the same time enabling you to do your job better, faster and cheaper. There is one initiative, the key enabler, to accomplish this goal—the digital thread. But let’s set the stage first.   Continue reading

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Separating Hype from Reality


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By Raymond Langlais Jr. – Nick Avdellas – Colin Finfrock – Russ Salley – Madelyn Newcomb

Additive manufacturing (AM) technology is changing and improving rapidly. For years, AM has been used for rapid prototyping, but as computing power and software, input materials, machine speed and performance have improved, AM has morphed into a method for end-use production with great potential for Department of Defense (DoD) use. Imagine a future battlefield where U.S. forces fully leverage AM capabilities to support their materiel needs—producing critical, but otherwise unavailable, parts on demand in the optimum location in the DoD supply chain. You can see why AM has captured the imagination of military planners. Continue reading

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Harnessing the Potential of Additive Manufacturing


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By Bill Decker

Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to enable the Department of Defense (DoD) to manufacture parts and components closer to the point of need, offering a huge opportunity to streamline the supply system. This could lead to the reduction, or eventual elimination of warehouses, wholesale stock, moving the point of sale from the original equipment manufacturer (OEM)/supplier to the point of use. Inventories of finished spare parts would be reduced, with commensurate reduction in facilities and staff to manage them, realizing significant savings for the DoD. Continue reading