Tag Archives: Mark Husband

Where Have All the Nunn-McCurdys Gone?


To print a PDF version of this article, click here.

Author: Mark Husband, Dr. Eng.

More than 2 years ago, I left a job I loved—teaching at the Defense Acquisition University—for an opportunity to work in the Office of Performance Assessments and Root Cause Analyses (PARCA). My primary responsibility is to conduct root cause analyses of troubled DoD acquisition programs—those that have undergone a critical Nunn-McCurdy breach, or others as assigned by the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics (USD[AT&L]) or by the Secretaries of the Military Departments.

Continue reading

Schedule or Event Driven? How Do I Know?


To print a PDF copy of this article, click here.

Author: Mark Husband, Dr.Eng.

Acquisition professionals know that program schedules should be established via “event-driven” planning. But what is the distinction between a schedule- versus an event-driven program? The author proposes that schedule-driven programs are distinguished not by whether they are behind schedule or have little margin, but by how management sets and controls schedules.

Continue reading

Should-Cost Management Tactics


To print a PDF copy of this article, click here.

Authors: Mark Husband and John Mueller

Since the 2010 release of the Better Buying Power (BBP) memo from Deputy Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter, Ph.D., (at the time the under secretary of Defense for acquisition, technology and logistics [USD(AT&L)]), the concept of should-cost management has been passionately discussed and debated by the acquisition workforce. Frequently asked questions include:

Continue reading

The AoA An Early Filter to Create an Affordable Program


To print a PDF copy of this article, click here.

Authors: Mark Husband and Keith Kaspersen

An analysis of alternatives (AoA) has long been required for major defense acquisition programs (MDAPs) and major automated information system (MAIS) programs as a matter of DoD policy (DoDI 5000.02) and has recently become a requirement, as a result of the 2366 certification process and the Weapon Systems Acquisition Reform Act (WSARA) of 2009. While DoD has a long history of conducting AoAs prior to initiating major programs, the new statutory guidance on AoAs has increased AoAs’ importance and emphasis. This is consistent with an intentional, concerted transition in the Department’s acquisition culture to devoting more attention and planning to major programs earlier in the process (i.e., prior to milestone B). The statutory references to AoAs are brief and could be construed as inconsequential—merely codifying what had previously been required under DoD policy. However, the effects of the statutory guidance on AoAs have been more significant than a simple reading of the law might indicate.

Continue reading