Tag Archives: May 2015

Defense AT&L: May – June 2015


To print a full copy of this issue, click here. PDFs for individual articles can be printed from the articles themselves.


To print a full copy of this issue, click here. PDFs for individual articles can be printed from the articles themselves.

Tying Profit to Performance: A Valuable Tool, But Use With Good Judgment


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Author: Frank Kendall, Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics

One thing I enjoyed about working in industry was that everyone in the private sector understood the definition of success: It was profit. If something made a profit for a business, it was good. If something did not make a profit for a business, then it was not good. Profit is the fundamental reason that businesses exist: to make money for their owners or shareholders. Without profit, businesses die.

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Becoming a “Chaosmeister”


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Author: John Higbee

“These are the times that try [our] souls.” What was said in Revolutionary War times seems as apt today. Resources are shrinking. Our workforce is changing significantly with the departure of the baby boomers. The warfighter’s needs are in great flux, creating instability in Department of Defense (DoD) and military Services requirements. The gulf between Congress and the Executive Branch continues to widen, causing inconsistent direction and uncoordinated oversight. Industry is changing how it works with DoD, adding to the turmoil. Defense acquisition, always a tough job, is getting tougher.

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Performance-Based Logistics: A Readiness Strategy Tailor Made for Austere Times


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Author: Bill Kobren

In November 2012, the Department of Defense (DoD) identified “increas[ing] the use of performance-based logistics [PBL]” as a key initiative in support of DoD’s goal to incentivize productivity in industry and government, saying, “There is sufficient data on the effectiveness of PBL at reducing cost and improving support performance to conclude that if it is effectively implemented and managed, PBL yields significant benefits. Key activities include increasing the knowledge base of PBL through standard processes, tools, and training.”

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Source Selection Simulation Intact Team Training on Picking a Provider


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Authors: Tom Elsesser and Bill Long

Our Defense Acquisition Workforce struggles with a shortage of employees skilled in source selection—the art or science of choosing a provider for a product or service. The significant lack of experience is due to the recent hiring of many new workforce members, and few of these have been through the highs and lows of essentially a sequestration while determining the most likely offeror. Col. (Brig. Gen. select) Cameron G. Holt, then serving as director of contracting for Air Force Life Cycle Management Center (AFLCMC/Contracting Organization) at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida, identified this concern and spoke with Defense Acquisition University (DAU) Professor Bill Long about ways to resolve this dilemma.

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Integrating Intelligence and Acquisition to Meet Evolving Threats: Interview With Dr. Sean Kirkpatrick of the Defense Intelligence Agency


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Author: Brian Brodfuehrer

Efforts to improve integration between the requirements community and the acquisition community must now be expanded by adding the intelligence community into that partnership. This is because how we design and employ our systems is heavily influenced by the threats we face. Increased globalization of communication and technology sharing has enabled those threats to become more significant and pervasive, a trend that is not likely to diminish. To stay ahead of that threat, in a cost-effective way, the Acquisition, Intelligence, and Requirements (AIR) communities must partner in new ways and rely on each other’s strengths. This partnership or integration, must be present and active at each level in the Department of Defense (DoD) enterprise—from clear policy and governance down to program management and execution. At a minimum, we need to understand the threat and apply this understanding to drive our research, technology development, technology insertion, and existing program planned product improvements. Likewise, the intelligence community needs increased understanding of the requirements and acquisition demand for intelligence data necessary to build and operate weapon systems that are resilient and adaptable to this rapidly changing threat.

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Developing Non-Lethal Weapons: The Human Effects Characterization Process


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Authors: Wesley A. Burgei, Shannon E. Foley, and Lt. Col. Scott M. McKim, USAF

Armed only with lethal force, and facing vehicles that didn’t stop, U.S. warfighters manning a checkpoint in Iraq were left with a difficult choice—engagement with lethal force against an unknown entity or risk being attacked. Tragically, some drivers didn’t comprehend warnings.

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The First 100 Days of an Acquisition Workforce Manager


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Author: Michael Cook

Good managers and bad managers. We have all had both and have aspired to learn from the good managers and never repeat the negative influences of the bad. During our professional development, if we excel and move up, we one day may attain the status of “manager of others.” Some new managers within the acquisition workforce benefit from formal training and mentorship programs, while others do not. Regardless of the path taken to the title, success evolves from one’s plan.

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Acquisition Pros Keep the Gears Moving


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Author: Janice Laurenti

The Department of Defense (DoD) has been working diligently to replenish its workforce, including the acquisition workforce that was drastically reduced to approximately 147,000 in 1998. Problems resulting from the downsizing quickly began to surface. The DoD realized it did not include the crucial data about the number of soon-to-retire employees in the total workforce reduction. The cutback therefore turned out greater than had been estimated.

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