Tag Archives: Mike Kotzian

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Performance Based Logistics … What’s Stopping Us?


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Authors: Jim Davis, Dean Newman, and Mike Kotzian

Nearly everyone agrees that performance based logistics (PBL) solutions can be effective logistics support vehicles that can improve both readiness and deliver real savings. So, then why aren’t the majority of our weapon systems supported under PBL arrangements? To address this question, let’s look to identify the key qualities of successful PBL teams as well as the vital ingredients that go into a successful arrangement.

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Tailoring and Critical Thinking—Key Principles for Acquisition Success


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Authors: Mike Kotzian, D.M., Michael Paul, and Jesse Stewart

Kotzian is a professor of program management in the Mid-Atlantic Region of the Defense Acquisition University (DAU). He has a doctorate in management from the University of Maryland University College. Paul is the associate dean for Outreach and Mission Assistance at the DAU’s Mid-Atlantic Region. Stewart is the Major Defense Acquisition Programs Director at the Defense Systems Management College.

Based on recent Department of Defense (DoD) acquisition guidance, programs now have the opportunity to approach acquisition program management in ways previously viewed as nontraditional. Unfortunately, many programs are hesitant to veer too far from accepted routines, thereby not taking advantage of opportunities to explore new acquisition approaches. In one partnership between the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and U.S. Navy, however, such opportunities have been fully embraced and may provide future programs with touchstones on how to increase program cost-effectiveness and efficiency as well as program success.

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Scheduling and SVTs: Rx for Efficiency


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Authors: Lynnetta Babuchiwski, Matthew Wilkinson, Kelli Coon, Mike Kotzian, and Duane Mallicoat

Even though Benjamin Franklin first voiced this well-known adage in the 1700s, the message remains relevant in today’s time of increased program scrutiny. For acquisition programs, the relevancy is clear as a program’s “health” is assessed continually across four interdependent factors: cost, schedule, performance and risk. In the context of Franklin’s adage, a program office measures “time” through the schedule factor.

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Where Sustainment Meets Deployed Forces Do You Really Know Who’s Going to Maintain Your Aircraft and Where It’s Going to be Maintained?


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Authors: Cmdr. Mark Nieto, Ann Wood, Mike Kotzian, and Duane Mallicoat

Did you know that an 18-year-old is fixing a $55 million aircraft on the flight deck of an aircraft carrier at night, with rolling seas and salt spray shooting across the flight deck? Did you know that a 20-year-old is on deployment in Afghanistan maintaining an aircraft that just landed in a sandstorm? And, finally, did you know that a South Korean aerospace company is performing scheduled depot maintenance on U.S. Marine Corps helicopters?

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The Climate/Team Effectiveness Survey Another ‘Tool’ for the Program Management Office Team


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Authors: Capt. Fred Hepler, USN, Mike Kotzian, and Duane Mallicoat

The challenges facing an acquisition Program Management Office (PMO) team are endless. With the charge to navigate an acquisition process that typically has innumerable moving parts at any one time—and all with a very thin margin of error in terms of meeting cost, schedule, performance, and affordability goals—every PMO team must be effective and adaptable across all phases of the acquisition process. Adding to this complexity is the PMO team’s need to interface and coordinate with various key stakeholders and, potentially, some geographically dispersed organizational supporting sites.

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A Cost-Efficient Approach to Inventory Management Using IUID to Meet an Organization’s Specific Requirements


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Authors: Mindy Rash-Gehres, Jerry Decker, Mike Kotzian, Duane Mallicoat, Tim Simpson, and Robert Landry

Members of the Department of Defense (DoD) acquisition workforce are very familiar with the “S-curve” that describes a weapon system’s life-cycle costs; they also know that approximately 60 percent to 70 percent (or more) of a weapon system’s life-cycle costs are typically associated with day-to-day operations and support (O&S) costs. In other words, O&S costs comprise more than half the total ownership cost (TOC) of most programs, and for this reason O&S costs have become the target of many proposed savings initiatives. One projected savings area within the O&S budget is “better inventory management.” Inventory management is the focus of this article—in particular, the efforts of the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technology Division (EODTECHDIV), Indian Head, Md.

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CBRN Survivability Is Your Program Ready?


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Authors: Jorge Hernandez, Mike Kotzian, and Duane Mallicoat

The insidious threat posed by chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) weapons has significantly changed how U.S., allied, and coalition forces must now prepare for joint operations. CBRN survivability has become a game-changer in a way that no other threat has. To formalize the growing importance of this capability, the DoD modified an existing policy (DoD Instruction 5000.02, Operation of the Defense Acquisition System) and developed a new policy (DoD Instruction 3150.09, The CBRN Survivability Policy) to better ensure that program offices address CBRN defense requirements as early as possible in a weapon system’s acquisition life cycle. These policies provide top-level guidance for weapon systems that are expected to survive and execute missions in a CBRN environment.

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