Tag Archives: November-December 2014

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Defense AT&L: November – December 2014


To print a PDF copy of this issue click here. Individual articles can be printed from the articles themselves.


To print a PDF copy of this issue click here. Individual articles can be printed from the articles themselves.

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Please Reduce Cycle Time


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Author: Brian Schultz

As William Penn noted centuries ago, time might be our most precious resource but it is also one that we have trouble managing effectively. While cost-performance trade-offs get a lot of emphasis in developmental acquisition efforts, schedule or cycle time is also an important part of the cost-schedule-performance triad that determines outcomes. Note that the terms “cycle time” and “schedule” will be used interchangeably in this article to mean the total time required from program initiation until Initial Operational Capability (IOC).

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The Big IDEA Dynamic Stakeholder Management


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Authors: Lt. Col. Franklin D. Gaillard II, USAF and Frank Gaillard, Ph.D.

Who holds a stake in your program? What are their interests? Would your program flourish or spiral downward without their advocacy?

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Think Portfolios, Not Programs


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Authors: Mike Janiga and Pete Modigliani

The Department of Defense (DoD) can foster dynamic and innovative solutions for tomorrow’s warfighter by designing acquisition portfolios that deliver an integrated suite of capabilities. Program executive officers (PEOs) today often focus on executing a dozen similar, but independent, programs. In contrast, large commercial businesses manage integrated product lines for items ranging from automobiles and electronics to software and health services. The DoD could leverage this model as a basis for constructing portfolios of similar programs that deliver enhanced capabilities in shorter timeframes.

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Mining Hidden Gems Extract Information Systems’ Value


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Authors: John Kruse and Maura Slattery

More than 10 years ago, the Department of Defense (DoD) Chief Information Officer took a bold step toward broad information sharing by publishing the seminal Net-Centric Data Strategy. Since then, the Services have made great strides by creating many new data sources across the DoD. Still, taking advantage of all this pent-up capability and value remains a difficult task for most of the enterprise.

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The Path to Software Cost Control


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Authors: Dr. James R. Eckardt, Timothy L. Davis, Richard A. Stern, Dr. Cindy S. Wong, Richard K. Marymee, and Arde L. Bedjanian

Many programs risk cost growth and schedule delays because of software development issues. In the 2010 Government Accountability Office (GAO) defense acquisition report, Assessments of Selected Weapon Programs, the programs with count growth in significant source line of code (SLOC) since development startup experienced accelerated cost increases and excessive schedule delays relative to other programs. The report asserted that collecting, tracking and containing software defects in the phase where they occur is an excellent cost-control management practice. Programs surveyed indicated that an average of 31 percent of defects corrected were detected after the development phase in which they were inserted. Capturing software defects in phase is critical because detecting defects out of phase results in expensive program rework.

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Meaningful Metrics Measuring Success of Software Integration Testing Labs


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Authors: Christian Hagen, Steven Hurt, and Andrew Williams

The U.S. military is moving from a world dominated by advanced hardware to one of fully integrated, complex systems of both hardware and software—a move that makes it even more relevant for the military to understand how to measure and test systems with data-driven metrics and easily measurable results.

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Avoiding Proprietary Problems A Software Clean-Room Method


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Author: Don O’Neill

Heads up! With 80 percent of government software procured as commercial off-the- shelf (COTS) and accorded limited or restricted rights, government acquisition managers need to be alert to intellectual property considerations. When modified and extended through government funding, COTS software becomes government off-the-shelf (GOTS) software entitled to government purpose rights. Unless the government acquisition manager insists on it, a contractor may engage in false claims practice by improperly marketing and selling GOTS software products as COTS. So instead of receiving the benefits of government purpose rights, the government may be charged a commercial product licensing fee and accorded only limited or restricted rights. Neglecting intellectual property rights can be costly!

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General TCF Closure Tasks in the U.S. Army Signal Corps


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Author: Capt. Jeffrey P. Stevens, USA

The 198th Expeditionary Signal Battalion (ESB) provided unparalleled communications support to the warfighters during its 2013–2014 deployment to Afghanistan. The ESB provided tactical satellite communications, network operations expertise, and cable and wire services. This National Guard Battalion is comprised of three units from Delaware and a fourth from South Carolina. The Battalion faced the unique challenge of learning how to close a Technical Control Facility (TCF). The Battalion met this daunting task with detailed preparation and coordination, effectively closing four TCFs.

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A View From Space NASA Systems Engineering and Test


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Author: Woody Spring

It has been three years since I witnessed the last Space Shuttle launch, STS-135, lifting off from Earth on July 8, 2011. It was the seventh I had witnessed, but this one had special meaning. Twenty-nine years ago, I was on the inside looking out as a part of the STS-23 (STS 61-B) crew. I flew Atlantis on her second flight in 1985 and had observed her construction years earlier at Rockwell International’s space shuttle-assembly location.

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