Tag Archives: Timothy J. Eveleigh

Improving Program Success Through Systems Engineering Tools in Pre-Milestone B Acquisition Phase


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Author: Daniel Deitz, Timothy J. Eveleigh, Thomas H. Holzer, and Shahryar Sarkani

Today, programs are required to do more with less. With 70 percent of a system’s life-cycle cost set at pre-Milestone B, the most significant cost savings potential is prior to Milestone B. Pre-Milestone B efforts are usually reduced to meet tight program schedules. This article proposes a new Systems Engineering Concept Tool and Method (SECTM) that uses genetic algorithms to quickly identify optimal solutions. Both are applied to unmanned undersea vehicle design to show process feasibility. The method increases the number of alternatives assessed, considers technology maturity risk, and incorporates systems engineering cost into the Analysis of Alternatives process. While not validated, the SECTM would enhance the likelihood of success for sufficiently resourced programs.

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Reusing DoD Legacy Systems: Making the Right Choice


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Authors: Meredith Eiband, Timothy J. Eveleigh, Thomas H. Holzer, and Shahryar Sarkani

Department of Defense (DoD) programs often experience cost overruns and technical difficulties due to reuse of legacy systems. With today’s fiscal climate of resource-constrained DoD budgets, reuse of legacy systems is frequently touted as the solution to cost, efficiency, and time-to-delivery problems; however, cost overruns and technical difficulties can significantly diminish any perceived benefits. Through evaluation of eight diverse DoD programs, this research shows that the state of a legacy system’s documentation, availability of subject matter expertise, and complexity/feasibility of integration are key factors that must be analyzed. Based on these three key factors, the authors propose a framework to aid both the DoD and defense contractors in the evaluation of legacy systems for potential efficient and effective reuse.

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